Miss Amber May

Digital Approaches to Fine Art

College Life Cinamagraph Series (Final Project!)

December 11th, 2013

GIFToothbrush

GIFtoilet

PhotoshBath

GIFMilk

GIFNest

GIFSoda

GIFLibrar

GIFFountain

GIFLeaves

GIFCar

Untitled-16

GIFStop

 

GIFIpod

GIFsurf

Stare

GIFPopcorn

 

Dishes

ppinkie

Apple Roll & Melting (GIFs)

November 11th, 2013

 

 

Applegif

 

 

melt

Gifs!

November 6th, 2013

sonic

 

 

cat

“Crunchtastic!”

November 4th, 2013

Normal BoyDiscoveryVillainRichmond AttackSignal

Alec Soth and Robin Rhode

October 27th, 2013

Alec Soth is an artist and photographer who’s works have have been exhibited across the U.S. and Europe. His photographs center around the reminiscence of his home back in Minnesota and the ideas of meeting and “finding chemistry with strangers.” His most popular work was Sleeping by the Mississippi (2004), which was a book featuring various photographs of people and places in his hometown. Another work was Fashion Magazine (2007), where he took portraits of beautiful French women and compared them to women from his Minnesota home. He does this to explain how he sees women and why he sees them a certain way. He enjoys taking photos of timeworn settings because he’s more interested in what the photos have to say rather than the elements in them.

I think alot of Alec Soth’s photographs could work really well as movie stills because of the stories that each photograph could convey. I think my favorite photo from Soth is “Herman’s Bed” from the Sleeping by the Mississippi series. This image contains so much variety and color that one would think that the economy was way overdone. It’s not because despite the amount of objects in the background and on the ceiling, the red bed in the center brings the whole photograph together. Among the chaos, it provides a place for the eye to rest. This image struck me so much because it sort of reminds me of what goes on in my mind as I’m laying on my bed…thoughts and scenarios rolling back and forth, people, recollections, stories, ideas, fears, and plans for the future. (This is basically my A.D.D. in a nutshell.) Gosh, I wish I could have this picture as a poster on my wall.

 

Robin Rhode is a South African multidisciplinary artist who combines visuals and storytelling to create 2D pieces that interact with 3D spaces. He creates his art using temporary tools, such as chalk, charcoal, and soap, and he uses them to comment on subjects of urban youth and socio-economic issues. He also specializes in animation, modeling, photography, and performance on a variety of canvases. Many of his works utilize an animation storyboard format to show spatial movement overtime, such as in the piece below called “A Spanner in the Works of Infinity.” He does this to combine visuals and storytelling to create 2D pieces that interact with 3D spaces. Rhode has given a new light to the aesthetics of urban culture and it feels like one could jump right into his works and become apart of the art.

 

“CRUNCHTASTIC”

October 21st, 2013

Crunchtastic

October 20th, 2013

Cory Archangel

October 20th, 2013

 

When we play video games, we rarely stop to pay attention to the actual art of the game. Cory Arcangel decided to put an end to this conception by spotlighting the beauty in technology and making us reconsider their values. Arcangel strives to combine technology with modern art by making the kinesthetic more aesthetic. He is best known for his video game modification art, which he creates by tweaking the programming mechanics in old NES cartridges to make them act a certain way. His most popular work called “Super Mario Clouds” is basically Nintendo’s Super Mario Brothers modified to where all of the sprites and backgrounds have been removed, leaving only the sky and scrolling clouds. Cory Arcangel is not only limited to art through video game modifications, he also designs works with other forms of media like video streaming, Photoshop, music, sculpture, and composition. In his sculpture entitled “Modified Dancing Stands”, located at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Miami, he introduces two wire stands modified to to sway together at slightly different speeds, causing them to go in and out of sync. Another piece entitled “Dances for the Electronic Piano” is not only a musical composition piece written for a Korg M1 electric piano, which is “famous for its use in classic Rave/Trance piano breakdowns,” but it is also visually appealing, portraying an image of two individuals seemingly dancing together. With every form of media Arcangel uses, he takes into account what the media was originally intended for and uses this as an advantage to get his themes across. Litterally, the medium is the message.

I think art is less about the final outcome of the work and more about how it’s made. Arcangel’s works may seem completely plain, but I believe the amount of work that was put into them really determines how the outcome should be perceived. In the case of Super Mario Clouds, I think the focus wasn’t the piece itself, but the mass amount of debate going on as a response. I do, however, disagree with the fact that he calls it “his” art when the clouds and coding itself was already designed by a background artist for the game. So even though Arcangel may have physically opened up the cartridge and manipulated some things, the initial appearance was still created by someone else. You cant just put a sticker over it and call it yours.

“Dextro and the Crunchtastics” -Based on a Dream by Amber May

October 12th, 2013

For years the danger-prone city of Glucotopia has had to endure different forms of supernatural onslaughts (giant hamster monsters, space alien meteor showers, dinosaurs wielding lightsabers, elderly supervillians forcing civilians to partake in their horrible fiber-based meals, ect.) until one fateful day where a young, middle school boy decides to walk into a local gas station and pick up what he calls “a sugary twist of fate.”

Dexter Dentyne thought it would be a good idea to pick up a candy bar on his way to his bi-weekly math club meeting. What poor Dexter DIDN’T know was that the candy bar he picked up was actually a failed experiment that was mistakenly released to the public by the National Candy Institution. This candy bar was known as ChemiCrunch, and not many were sold because of the unappealing title and the sickening greenish liquid oozing from the chocolate bar on the wrapper. This didn’t stop the daring Dexter from picking one up though, ironically  just 10 minutes before they were recalled by the government and immediately incinerated. However, after he bought it and took a bite, within moments he collapsed onto the sidewalk, also dropping the candybar; green liquid oozing from it. When Dexter woke up, he discovered something odd when he kicked a soccer ball into a small child, sending the child flying backwards into a wall. Super strength. Remembering that he was late to his meeting, he ran as fast as he could toward the school….too fast…He noticed as he ran the street behind him would immediately burst into flames due to the friction of his feet. Super speed. Just for kicks, he decided to jump to see what would happen. When he jumped, he didnt return to the ground. Flight.

It was later discovered that only 50 of these chocolate bars were sold and consumed. These few consumers were known throughout the city as “Crunchers,” super beings with a variety of powers used for good…and evil.

Kelli Connell

October 2nd, 2013

 

What do you see in the picture above? Two lovely women relaxing on the side of a country road enjoying the sunset, right? Look closer… As hard for it is to believe, this image is actually a self portrait of the one and only Kelli Connell. Connell is an American photographer who is known for her hyperrealistic Photoshop portraits, displaying herself and…herself! She creates these photos in a way that they seem like actual photographs taken at that very moment, but in reality she takes two or more photos and flawlessly melds them together. Connell explains on her website that the purpose of her photographs is to express the “representation of social and interior investigations that happen within the mind.” This means she wants to recreate the moments that she’s seen or endured  by moving the moments to an external environment, in this case, a photograph.It’s almost as if she wants to imagine herself in these situations. What she has also done is project the conflicting personalities and ideals of herself in two different individuals; representing the battles her psyche faces. These outlooks can include, sexuality, gender roles, the rational and irrational self, the feminine and masculine minds ect.

When I saw Connell’s photographs, I thought they were just photographs of her and a friend; I didn’t realize both people were her until I actually looked. My Photoshopped images could never compare to how much dedication and time she put into hers. The cropping was precise down to the last pixel and the lighting in each image was perfect and worked flawlessly with the backgrounds she put them in. I was so enthralled in the photos that I didn’t bother looking into them for deeper messages (which was why I was happy that they were posted at the top of her website.) I think she did a great job giving us insight into the sorts of situations she sees in her life and how those moments keep playing back in her preconscious. In these photographs she’s basically turning her mind inside out for the world to see.

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